Businesswomen filling paperwork for agreement
Copyright: bignai / 123RF Stock Photo

USCIS released a revised version of Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification, on July 17. Employers can use this revised version or continue using Form I-9 with a revision date of 11/14/16 N through Sept. 17, 2017. On Sept. 18, 2017 and thereafter employers must use this revised form with a revision date of 07/17/17 N.  It is not necessary to complete new I-9 forms for current employees.  Use the new edition of the form for new hires and reverifications.

Revisions to the Form I-9 instructions:

  • USCIS changed the name of the Office of Special Counsel for Immigration-Related Unfair Employment Practices to its new name, Immigrant and Employee Rights Section.
  • USCIS removed “the end of” from the phrase “the first day of employment.”

Revisions related to the List of Acceptable Documents on Form I-9:

  • USCIS added the Consular Report of Birth Abroad (Form FS-240) to List C.  Employers completing Form I-9 on a computer will be able to select Form FS-240 from the drop-down menus available in List C of Section 2 and Section 3.  E-Verify users will also be able to select Form FS-240 when creating a case for an employee who has presented this document for Form I-9.
  • USCIS combined all the certifications of report of birth issued by the Department of State (Form FS-545, Form DS-1350 and Form FS-240) into selection C#2 in List C.
  • USCIS renumbered all List C documents except the Social Security card. For example, the employment authorization document issued by the Department of Homeland Security on List C will change from List C #8 to List C #7.

These changes are also available in the revised Handbook for Employers: Guidance for Completing Form I-9 (M-274), which is also now available.

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Alka Bahal is a Partner and the Co-Chair of the Corporate Immigration Practice of Fox Rothschild LLP. Alka is situated in Fox Rothschild’s Morristown, New Jersey office though she practices throughout the United States and at Consulates worldwide. You can reach Alka at (973) 994-7800, or abahal@foxrothschild.com.

Businesswoman filing paperwork
Copyright: bignai / 123RF Stock Photo

On July 12, 2017 USCIS announced that it will release a revised version of Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification, on July 17, 2017. This new edition of the form, which will bear a revision date of 07/17/17 N, will become mandatory on September 18, 2017 and will replace all prior editions of the form as of that date. Employers may either use the current edition (with a revision date of 11/14/16 N) or the new edition, once released, through September 17, 2017. As of September 18, 2017, however, only the new edition will be acceptable for new hires or reverifications.

The new edition of the Form I-9 is expected to include the following changes:

 Revisions to the Form I-9 instructions:

  • The name of the “Office of Special Counsel for Immigration-Related Unfair Employment Practices” will be changed to its new name, “Immigrant and Employee Rights Section.”
  • “The end of” will be removed from the phrase “the first day of employment.”

Revisions related to the List of Acceptable Documents on Form I-9:

  • The Consular Report of Birth Abroad (Form FS-240) will be added to List C.
    • Employers completing Form I-9 on a computer will be able to select Form FS-240 from the drop-down menus available in List C of Section 2 and Section 3. E-Verify users will also be able to select Form FS-240 when creating a case for an employee who has presented this document for Form I-9.
  • All of the certifications of report of birth issued by the Department of State (Form FS-545, Form DS-1350 and Form FS-240) will be combined into selection Item 2 under List C.
  • All List C documents, except the Social Security card, will be renumbered.
    • For example, the employment authorization document issued by the Department of Homeland Security on List C will change from Item 8 under List C to Item 7 under List C.

All changes will be incorporated into a revised edition of the M-274 Handbook for Employers: Guidance for Completing Form I-9, which is also being revised to make it easier for users to navigate.

All U.S. employers are required to complete a Form I-9 for every employee hired in order to verify that the individual is authorized for employment in the United States under the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 (IRCA). Beginning September 18, 2017, employers must use the new version of the Form for all new hires and for re-verifying current employees with expiring employment authorization documentation. [Employers should not complete new Forms for existing employees who do not require re-verification.] A best practice would be for employers to begin using the new edition of the form immediately upon its release.

You may view the Office of Management and Budget Conclusion here and the final Federal register Notice effectuating these changes here.

Once released you may obtain the new edition of the Form I-9 (in English and Spanish), as well as the new M-274 Handbook for Employers: Guidance for Completing Form I-9 here.

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Alka Bahal is a Partner and the Co-Chair of the Corporate Immigration Practice of Fox Rothschild LLP. Alka is situated in Fox Rothschild’s Morristown, New Jersey office though she practices throughout the United States and at Consulates worldwide. You can reach Alka at (973) 994-7800, or abahal@foxrothschild.com.

In our continuing series of reports, Charles (“Charlie”) Oppenheim, Chief of the Visa Control and Reporting Division, U.S. Department of State, shares his most recent analysis of current trends and future projections for the various immigrant preference categories with AILA (the American Immigration Lawyers’ Association).

Below are highlights from the most recent “check-in with Charlie” (June 13, 2017), reflecting his analysis of current trends and future projections for the various immigrant preference categories.

This month, Charlie examines the final action date movements in the July 2017 Visa Bulletin and provides his projections for monthly final action date movement through the remainder of this fiscal year.

Check-in with DOS’s Charlie Oppenheim: June 13, 2017

EB-1 China and India. The final action date for EB-1 China and EB-1 India (January 1, 2012) that was imposed in June 2017 remains for July 2017 and is expected to hold through the end of this fiscal year. Due to the availability (through May) of “otherwise unused numbers” in these categories, EB-1 China has used more than 6,300 numbers and EB-1 India has used more than 12,900 so far this fiscal year.

EB-2 Worldwide. Since demand declined slightly in the second half of May, and demand during the first week of June was steady, Charlie felt comfortable keeping EB-2 Worldwide current in July. A final action cut-off date will be imposed in this category in August and will be more dramatic than it would have been if a date had been imposed in July. The good news is that this category will become current again on October 1, 2017.

EB-2 India. In July, the final action date for EB-2 India will advance three weeks to July 22, 2008. Charlie expects minimal advancement in this category through the rest of the fiscal year. The best case scenario for this fiscal year would be a final action date of September or October 2008.

Pressure on this category is attributable to high demand in EB-2 India and the lack of otherwise unused numbers under the EB-2 annual limit, which had been prevalent through FY-2015. Charlie noted that approximately 40 percent of the available EB-2 India numbers are being used by beneficiaries who have upgraded from EB-3 India.

EB-2 China and EB-3 China. For the first time this fiscal year, the final action date for EB-2 China is later than the final action date for EB-3 China. EB-2 China advanced three weeks in July to March 22, 2013, and Charlie expects slow progress in this category will continue. By contrast, EB-3 China will retrogress three years in July to January 1, 2012, as a result of a significant amount of EB-3 downgrades. The final action date for EB-3 China Other Workers will hold at July 15, 2006, and this date could also retrogress in August.

The final action date of January 1, 2012, for EB-3 China will hold through the end of this fiscal year, but will advance to October 1, 2014, effective October 1, 2017.

The annual allocation for EB-3 China is only 2,500 because the Chinese Student Protection Act requires an offset of 1,000 numbers from the China employment-based visa annual limit each fiscal year. Three hundred of those numbers are deducted from the EB-3 limit, and seven hundred numbers are deducted from the EB-5 limit.

EB-3 Worldwide. In July, EB-3 Worldwide will advance less than two months to June 8, 2017, keeping this category effectively current.

EB-3 India. In July, EB-3 India will advance five months to October 15, 2005, and should continue to advance. The otherwise unused numbers for EB-3 Worldwide are required to be allocated in order of priority date, meaning that these numbers will fall to EB-3 India, which has the earliest final action date in the EB-3 category.

EB-5 China. The final action date for EB-5 China will continue to hold at June 8, 2014, in July and Charlie expects this category to advance to by one week for August. Some additional forward movement in this category remains possible for September should demand by USCIS be less than estimated.

FB-4 Worldwide. In July, the final action date for FB-4 Worldwide will be May 8, 2004. Charlie hopes to advance this category later this fiscal year, but the data is too close to make a definitive prediction at this time. The response rate to the NVC “Agent of Choice” letters in this and most family-based categories is less than 50%, with less than 35% of those respondents providing all of the information required for a visa interview to be scheduled. Charlie reminds members that it is important to promptly respond to an “Agent of Choice” letter. If individuals who received “Agent of Choice” letters before April 2016 had responded promptly, more than 100,000 of them could have been scheduled for an interview by April 2017.

Special Immigrants. A final action date of August 15, 2015, will be imposed for EB-4 India in July. This date tracks the July final action date for El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Mexico (which advanced one month from June) and will continue to do so for the remainder of the fiscal year, possibly reaching October 2015. In October, EB-4 India is expected to return to current. A final action date for EB-4 will continue into FY 2018 for the other countries, though Mexico may have different date from El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras.

Note: numbers “otherwise unused” under the Worldwide EB-3 limit are allocated in order of priority date without regard to the per-country limitation. Therefore, such numbers would be provided to EB-3 India applicants, which are subject to the earliest final action date.

For July, EB-3 Philippines will advance one year to May 15, 2014, and will likely advance to a date in the fall of 2015 before the end of this fiscal year.

You may access the July 2017 Visa Bulletin here and the August 2017 Visa Bulletin (once available) here.

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Alka Bahal is a Partner and the Co-Chair of the Corporate Immigration Practice of Fox Rothschild LLP. Alka is situated in Fox Rothschild’s Roseland, New Jersey office though she practices throughout the United States and at Consulates worldwide. You can reach Alka at (973) 994-7800, or abahal@foxrothschild.com.

On 6/26/17, the Supreme Court granted certiorari, consolidated the 4th and 9th Circuit cases, partially lifted the lower court injunctions, permitting the government to ban U.S. travel by those nationals of Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen who do not have a credible claim of a bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the U.S., even though the Supreme Court will hear the merits of the case when it reconvenes in the fall.

Immediately after the court’s decision, the Department of State (DOS) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) both issued Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) regarding the implementation of Executive Order on June 29, 2017. Here is the summary.

Summary of DOS Cable and FAQs Regarding Implementation of EO-2

  • Individuals Subject to the Suspension of Entry: Foreign nationals from the six designated countries (Sudan, Syria, Iran, Libya, Somalia, and Yemen) who were outside the United States as of June 26, 2017; who did not have a valid visa at 5:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time on January 27, 2017; and who did not have a valid visa as of 8:00 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time on June 29, 2017, are subject to EO-2.
  • Individuals exempt from the order:
    • Any applicant who has a credible claim of a “bona fide relationship” with a person or entity in the United States.
      • Any such relationship with a “person” must be a close familial relationship, as defined below.
      • Any relationship with an entity must be formal, documented, and formed in the ordinary course, rather than for the purpose of evading EO 103780.
      • Eligible derivatives of principal visa applicants who are either deemed to be exempt from the EO’s suspension of entry or qualify for a waiver under the EO also receive the benefit of the exemption or waiver.
    • Any applicant who was in the United States on June 26, 2017;
    • Any applicant who had a valid visa at 5:00 p.m. EST on January 27, 2017, the day Executive Order 13769 was signed;
    • Any applicant who had a valid visa on June 29, 2017;
    • Any lawful permanent resident (LPR) of the United States;
    • Any applicant who is admitted to or paroled into the United States on or after June 26, 2017;
    • Any applicant who has a document other than a visa, valid on June 29, 2017, or issued on any date thereafter, that permits him or her to travel to the United States and seek entry or admission, such as advance parole.
  • Bona Fide Relationship With a Person in the U.S. – DOS defines a close family member as a parent (including parent-in-law), spouse, fiancé, child, adult son or daughter, son-in-law, daughter-in-law, or whole or half sibling (including step relationships). However, it does not include a grandparent, grandchild, aunt, uncle, niece, nephew, cousin, brother-in-law, sister-in-law, and any other “extended” family members.
  • Bona Fide Relationship with an Entity in the U.S.: The DOS cable provides the following examples of a “bona fide relationship” to a U.S. entity that will qualify:
    • An I visa applicant employed by foreign media that has a news office based in the U.S.;
    • Students from designated countries who have been admitted to U.S. educational institutions;
    • A worker who has accepted an offer of employment from a company in the U.S.; or
    • Lecturer invited to address an audience in the U.S.
    • The cable indicates that the following scenarios will not constitute a bona fide relationship with an entity in the U.S.:
    • A nonprofit group who seeks out clients from the designated countries, adds them to their client list, and then claims injury from their inclusion in the EO.
    • An individual whose only tie to the United States is a hotel reservation, whether paid or not.
  • Immigrant Visa Applicants: Certain self-petitioning employment-based immigrant visa applicants and diversity visa applicants may be covered by EO-2 and will need to establish they are exempt based on a bona fide relationship or qualify for a waiver.
  • Visa Revocation: DOS has confirmed that no visas issued before the EO’s effective date of June 29, 2017 will be revoked pursuant to the Executive Order. Any individual whose visa was marked or cancelled solely as a result of the original EO issued on January 27, 2017 (EO 13769) will be entitled to a travel document permitting travel to the U.S., so that the individual may seek entry. Any individual in this situation should contact the closest U.S. Consulate to request a travel document.
  • Visa Appointments at U.S. Consulates Abroad: Consulates will not cancel previously scheduled visa interview appointments and will continue to accept visa applications from foreign nationals from the designated countries. Consular officers will make a case-by-case determination on whether a foreign national is eligible for the requested visa classification before deciding whether he or she is exempt from EO-2. If not exempt, consular officers will determine whether the foreign national would qualify for a waiver. Consular officers can grant waivers on a case-by-case basis if the foreign national demonstrates that his or her entry into the U.S. is in the national interest and will not pose a threat to national security, and that denying the visa would cause undue hardship. If the principal applicant qualifies for an exemption or waiver, qualified derivatives would also get such benefit.
  • Waivers: Individuals who are not exempt from EO-2’s suspension of entry to the United States may seek a waiver. The EO permits, and the DOS further confirms, that Consular Officers are permitted to grant waivers and authorize the issuance of a visas on a case-by-case basis, if the applicant demonstrates to the Officer’s satisfaction that all of the following three criteria are met:
    • Denying entry under the 90-day suspension would cause undue hardship;
    • His or her entry would not pose a threat to national security; and
    • His or her entry would be in the national interest. “Unless the adjudicating consular officer has particular concerns about a case that causes the officer to believe that that issuance may not be in the national interest, a determination that a case falls under [any of EO-2’s criteria for when a waiver “could be appropriate”] is a sufficient basis for concluding a waiver is in the national interest. Determining that a case falls under some of these circumstances may also be a sufficient basis for concluding that denying entry during the 90-day suspension would cause undue hardship.”
    • Notably, Consular Officers are instructed to determine that if any individual falls under any of EO-2’s criteria for when a waiver “could be appropriate”, that individual should be granted a waiver. Specifically, the cable states:
  • Refugees: The U.S. Refugee Admissions Program (USRAP) is suspended for 120 days, except for cases where an applicant has a credible claim of a “bona fide relationship” with a person or entity in the United States. The “bona fide relationship” test set forth by the Supreme Court to establish whether one has a qualifying with a person or entity in the United States is the same for a refugee as it is for a nonimmigrant, immigrant, or diversity visa applicant.

Summary of DHS FAQs Regarding Implementation of EO-2

  • Foreign national from one of the six designated countries who was present in the U.S. on June 26, 2017, who was admitted on a single-entry or a multiple-entry visa will not be subject to EO-2 when applying for a subsequent visa.
  • Foreign national from one of the six designated countries who was present in the U.S. on June 26, 2017, but whose visa will expire during travel abroad, will not be subject to EO-2 when applying for a new visa in order to return to the U.S.
  • A U.S. lawful permanent resident who is a citizen of one of the designated countries and who is a member of the Trusted Traveler Program will not be subject to membership revocation based on the EO-2.
  • The EO does not apply to refugees who were formally scheduled for transit prior to 8pm EDT on Thursday, June 29, 2017.

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Alka Bahal is a Partner and the Co-Chair of the Corporate Immigration Practice of Fox Rothschild LLP. Alka is situated in Fox Rothschild’s Morristown, New Jersey office though she practices throughout the United States and at Consulates worldwide. You can reach Alka at (973) 994-7800, or abahal@foxrothschild.com.

US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) announced yesterday that beginning on May 31, 2017, it will email reminders to Visa Waiver Program travelers notifying them of their “last possible departure date from the US”.  In addition, CBP added a feature to its website https://i94.cbp.dhs.gov/I94/#/home so that travelers may check their last possible departure date online.

 For now, only those admitted to the US under the Visa Waiver Program can benefit from the new features, but CBP indicated that it will incorporate additional nonimmigrant travelers with future updates. 

 To check their last possible date of departure, Visa Waiver Program travelers can enter the www.cbp.gov.  Then, click on Get Most Recent I-94.  From there, click on View Compliance. When I tried the system, sometimes the screen which included the View Compliance option appeared directly without having to click Get Most Recent I-94.  Either way, ultimately the option that is needed is View Compliance.  In the next screen after clicking View Compliance, a traveler may enter his/her name, birthdate, passport number and country of passport issuance to find the number of days remaining in the period of stay and end date of admission.  For Waivered Tourists, the next screen should indicate the number of days remaining before their last date of departure.

 

Ali Brodie, Counsel, Fox Rothschild LLPFox counsel Ali Brodie, who heads Fox’s EB-5 Immigrant Investor Services practice, has written a piece for Law360 providing a comprehensive view of reform efforts centered on the EB-5 program. Extended to September 30, 2017, there are now bipartisan discussions to update and improve the program. Changes being discussed include reclassification of Targeted Employment Areas (TEAs), increases to minimum investment amounts, and stricter integrity and oversight measures. Lawmakers are also considering changes to the number of visas available annually, and more efficient processing to address the application backlog.

We invite you to read the full piece “Potential EB-5 Changes Ahead,” originally published by Law360 on May 16, 2017.

Today, Congress submitted a proposed omnibus spending bill to extend funding to the government through September 30, 2017.  The EB-5 Regional Center Program is included in the bill which proposes a clean extension without any of the much-debated reforms.  If approved, the EB-5 Regional Center Program will be extended through September 30, 2017, offering lawmakers and stakeholders additional time to reach a long-term legislative solution.

Today, Congress extended the EB-5 Program for 1 week through May 5, 2017.  The Program was extended as part of a continuing resolution (CR) funding the federal government through May 5, 2017, thus preventing a government shutdown.  The EB-5 Program would have otherwise sunset today.  The President has until midnight tonight to sign the CR.

This is welcome news for EB-5 industry stakeholders as the program is alive for another week and allows more time for negotiations with lawmakers, with the ultimate goal of reaching a deal that would reform the program with a long-term reauthorization.

In our continuing series of reports, Charles (“Charlie”) Oppenheim, Chief of the Visa Control and Reporting Division, U.S. Department of State, shares his most recent analysis of current trends and future projections for the various immigrant preference categories with AILA (the American Immigration Lawyers’ Association).

Below are highlights from the most recent “check-in with Charlie” (April 16, 2017), reflecting his analysis of current trends and future projections for the various immigrant preference categories.

This month, Charlie offers his analysis of current trends and future projections for the various immigrant preference categories for the beginning of the next fiscal year (May 2017) and beyond.                                                                      

Check-in with DOS’s Charlie Oppenheim: April 16, 2017

FB-4 Worldwide. FB-4 Worldwide should be watched closely. Following aggressive movement of the final action date in April, this category is not expected to advance. The April movement seems to have stimulated applicants to take action, and increased demand may require a temporary retrogression in this category later this fiscal year. Should retrogression occur, the category would recover completely in October, the first month of the new fiscal year. The final action dates for all other family-based categories are expected remain stable.

EB-1 and EB-2 Worldwide. As noted in the May 2017 Visa Bulletin, EB-1 and EB-2 Worldwide demand at USCIS has increased dramatically over the past six weeks, signaling the possibility of a future correction to the final action date. Charlie explained that number usage in both of these categories for January and February was about 1,000 higher than earlier months and he expects that it will be at least that high, if not higher, in April. While this is positive in the sense that USCIS is clearing out and approving cases, it may limit the ability for the agencies to take final action on pending cases towards the end of the summer if a correction is required.

EB-1 India and China. Charlie has been predicting the imposition of a final action cut-off date for EB-1 China and India for several months and echoes that warning in the May Visa Bulletin. Charlie tells AILA that the only reason a final action cut-off date has not already been imposed is that thus far, India and China have been able to benefit from “otherwise unused numbers” not currently required for other countries. The use of “otherwise unused numbers” by these two countries will soon end in order to ensure that other countries who have not yet reached their EB-1 per country limit can remain “current.” The worldwide demand and heavy use of EB-4 and EB-5 numbers, which in earlier years had remained unused and had “fallen up” to EB-1, has resulted in the restriction of EB-1 number use strictly to those numbers available to that category on an annual basis.

Charlie predicts that a final action cut-off date will be imposed for EB-1 China and India no later than July. When that occurs, both countries will have the same final action date. While these categories will not technically become “unavailable,” the date that is imposed will effectively shut off the use of additional numbers.

EB-2 India. March demand for EB-2 India doubled from February. Based on this spike in demand, Charlie can no longer say with confidence that this category will recover to last year’s level. However, there may still be some room for the date to advance further, and based on current demand patterns, the absolute best case scenario would be for the final action date to reach December 2008. The wildcard factor is whether EB-3 upgrades will subside or continue at the same or faster pace. Charlie lacks visibility into EB-3 upgrade demand until a visa number is requested, and therefore cannot plan final action date movements with as much precision as he would like.

The China EB-3 Downgrade Phenomenon. The gap between EB-2 China and EB-3 China continues to widen in May, with EB-3 China advancing six months to October 1, 2014 and EB-2 China advancing less than one month to February 8, 2013. Consistent with this trend, AILA members should not expect any significant advancement in the final action date for EB-2 China this fiscal year. By contrast, we may continue to see a healthy advancement of EB-3 China until or unless the expected EB-3 downgrade phenomenon materializes.

Based on current data, Charlie predicts that the final action date for EB-2 China may advance as far as a date in spring or summer 2013 before the end of this fiscal year.

EB-4 Religious Workers and EB-5 Investors (I5 and R5). Both the EB-4 Religious Worker and EB-5 Investor Programs will sunset on April 28, 2017 unless reauthorized by Congress. As such, the May Visa Bulletin notes that both of these categories will be unavailable in May unless Congress acts. Should Congress reauthorize both programs, EB-4 will return to current with the exception of EB-4 El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Mexico, which would be subject to a July 15, 2015 final action date. With regard to these countries, and despite healthy demand, Charlie maintains that it is still possible that the final action date may advance before the end of the fiscal year.

If the Investor Program is reauthorized, all countries except China would become current, with a final action date of June 1, 2014 for EB-5 China (I5 and R5).

You may access the May 2017 Visa Bulletin here, the April 2017 Visa Bulletin here, and the March 2017 Visa Bulletin here.

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Alka Bahal is a Partner and the Co-Chair of the Corporate Immigration Practice of Fox Rothschild LLP. Alka is situated in Fox Rothschild’s Roseland, New Jersey office though she practices throughout the United States and at Consulates worldwide. You can reach Alka at (973) 994-7800, or abahal@foxrothschild.com.

On Tuesday, April 18, 2017, President Donald Trump signed a new Executive Order, “Buy American and Hire American.” The new Order states that its first purposes is to focus on conducting studies and putting forth plans for federal agencies to immediately maximize the use and procurement of materials and products made in the U.S. (“Buy American”).

The second stated purpose of the Order focuses on a review of current immigration policies and regulations, specifically at H-1B visa program, and non-immigrant visa categories (for skilled foreign national workers) (“Hire American”).

The Order also directs government agencies to tighten up on visa fraud and abuse in the particulate with the H-1B visa program. The Order also directs that the government will fully prioritize the use of American companies and goods in federal projects.

The government has reported that 199,000 H-1B applications were submitted for the 2018 fiscal year, according to data from the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, compared with the 236,000 H-1B cap petitions filed during the prior year.

In an interview earlier today with Snap On’s CEO, Nicholas Pinchuk, who said in a statement “The upskilling of the American workforce is the seminal issue of our time. We must refocus on technical education, restore our respect for the dignity of work, and celebrate technical jobs not as the consolation prize of our society, but as what they really are — a national calling essential to our ongoing prosperity.”

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Alka Bahal is a Partner and the Co-Chair of the Corporate Immigration Practice of Fox Rothschild LLP. Alka is situated in Fox Rothschild’s Roseland, New Jersey office though she practices throughout the United States and at Consulates worldwide. You can reach Alka at (973) 994-7800, or abahal@foxrothschild.com.