Congress in 2015 tried to tackle new EB-5 reform legislation, but instead chose to extend the program without any changes until September 30, 2016. This was a result of an impasse on issues relating to increase in the capital threshold amount and the change in the metrics used to determine what is a (“TEA”) targeted

Since September 30, 2015 Congress has considered several immigration bills that would have completely overhauled the EB-5 program. All of us in the space, especially attorneys, had prepared ourselves for the inevitable change of the current EB-5 regulations. We all knew that the minimum capital threshold requirement would increase to $800,000. In addition, the targeted

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What will Congress do with the soon to expire EB-5 regional center program?

That is the question that most everyone in the EB-5 world is asking each other. Congress chose on September 30th of this year to “kick the proverbial can down the road” until December 11, 2015 with an interim extension of the current

In our continuing series of reports, Charles (“Charlie”) Oppenheim, Chief of the Visa Control and Reporting Division, U.S. Department of State, shares his most recent analysis of current trends and future projections for the various immigrant preference categories with AILA (the American Immigration Lawyers’ Association).

Below are highlights from the most recent “check-in with Charlie”

The State Department continues to report that “technical problems” with overseas systems preventing the Bureau of Consular Affairs from issuing visas, passports and other travel documents, since last week.

Most U.S. Consulates and Embassies websites contain this (or similar posting):

“The Department of State’s Bureau of Consular Affairs is currently experiencing technical problems with our

Charles (“Charlie”) Oppenheim, Chief of the Visa Control and Reporting Division, U.S. Department of State, shares his analysis of current trends and future projections for the various immigrant preference categories with AILA (the American Immigration Lawyers’ Association). 

Below are highlights from the most recent “check-in with Charlie”, reflecting his analysis of current trends and future

The new federal fiscal year begins on October 1, bringing an infusion of visa numbers.  Recently, Charles (“Charlie”) Oppenheim, Chief of the Visa Control and Reporting Division, U.S. Department of State, recently shared his analysis of current trends and future projections for the various immigrant preference categories with AILA (the American Immigration Lawyers’ Association).

Below

Although the rules are clear that Section 1 of the I-9 form must be completed by the employee, the recent introduction of the new Form I-9 in a PDF fillable format and the more widespread use of computerized systems for the I-9 process have raised questions about how information may be entered into Section 1.

Following up on my recent story on the matter, I had the opportunity to speak with Colin O’Keefe of LXBN regarding the Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act moving swiftly through the Senate Judiciary Committee. In the interview, I explain a little about what this happened and what this may signal for the

The Department of State’s Visa Office releases its statistics on demand and how it determines monthly Employment Preference Cut-Off dates:

How it works:  Each month, the Visa Office subdivides the annual preference and foreign state limitations specified by the INA into monthly allotments based on totals of documentarily qualified immigrant visa applicants reported at consular