U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS)

The U.S. Department of Justice recently announced significant increases in fines for immigration-related paperwork violations, in an interim final rule slated to take effect this fall. Harsher financial penalties come as part of the federal government’s recently-expanded efforts to ensure that employers comply with strict verification, recordkeeping, and document retention requirements, with regard to the

In a continuation of its effort to encourage eligible immigrants to become U.S. citizens, the Obama administration is proposing adjustments to the immigration benefit fee schedule that would raise the cost of some benefits but reduce naturalization fees for certain low-income immigrants.

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) released its proposed changes to the U.S.

Congress in 2015 tried to tackle new EB-5 reform legislation, but instead chose to extend the program without any changes until September 30, 2016. This was a result of an impasse on issues relating to increase in the capital threshold amount and the change in the metrics used to determine what is a (“TEA”) targeted

Since September 30, 2015 Congress has considered several immigration bills that would have completely overhauled the EB-5 program. All of us in the space, especially attorneys, had prepared ourselves for the inevitable change of the current EB-5 regulations. We all knew that the minimum capital threshold requirement would increase to $800,000. In addition, the targeted

With the end of STEM OPT looming, the US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) published a much-awaited Proposed Rule on October 19, 2015, regarding STEM OPT and Cap-Gap Relief.  (See https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2015/10/19/2015-26395/improving-and-expanding-training-opportunities-for-f-1-nonimmigrant-students-with-stem-degrees-and.)

Highlights of the Proposed Rule, captioned “Improving and Expanding Training Opportunities for F-1 Nonimmigrant Students with STEM Degrees and Cap-Gap Relief for All

Since 2008, DHS has permitted F-1 students whose study was in a STEM field and whose employer is an E-Verify participant to have an additional 17-month period of OPT (Optional Practical Training).  Thousands of students and E-Verify employers have benefited from this extended period of employment authorization.  The work of these students has resulted in

The State Department continues to report that “technical problems” with overseas systems preventing the Bureau of Consular Affairs from issuing visas, passports and other travel documents, since last week.

Most U.S. Consulates and Embassies websites contain this (or similar posting):

“The Department of State’s Bureau of Consular Affairs is currently experiencing technical problems with our

Reminder:  Effective today, May 26, 2015, the Immigration Service will accept applications for employment authorization from “certain H-4 dependent spouses of H-1B nonimmigrants”. (Employment Authorization for Certain H-4 Dependent Spouses Web page).

An H-4 spouse may only apply for an EAD (employment authorization document) if the H-4’s H-1B spouse is pursuing US permanent

The Department of Homeland Security (“DHS”) is the parent agency of several sub-agencies including U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (“USCIS”); U.S. Customs and Border Protection (“CBP”) and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (“ICE”).   These agencies are tasked with all of immigration-related affairs.  In December 2014,  DHS was the only agency that did not receive full-year

Are you that “certain someone”?  That “certain spouse” of an H-1B worker who will be eligible for H-4 work authorization?  Not sure?  Here’s the scoop.

At long last, on Wednesday, February 25, 2015, the US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) published a Federal Register Notice captioned, “Employment Authorization for Certain H-4 Dependent Spouses; Final Rule”.