Intracompany Transferees (L-1 and Permanent Residence)

On November 14, 2019, the Department of Homeland Security published a notice of proposed rulemaking in the Federal Register to adjust the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) Immigration Examinations Fee Account (IEFA) fee schedule.  The public comment period is open until December 16, 2019.

Unlike most government agencies, USCIS is fee-funded.  According to the

The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) announced that the filing fee for premium processing will increase from $1,225 to $1,410, beginning on October 1, 2018.  According to USCIS, this 15% increase in price is in step with inflation since DHS last adjusted premium processing rates in 2010 and will allow USCIS to more effectively

If Congress cannot resolve FY2018 funding issues by December 8, 2017, it will result in another federal government shutdown. Such a shutdown will impact immigration services across a number of different government agencies, affecting many of the systems and processes employers rely on to facilitate employment, including E-Verify, visa petition processing, labor certifications and other

Today, December 23, 2016, USCIS posted a large number of new form versions. The forms all have an effective date of today, December 23, 2016, and the website indicates that no other versions of the forms are acceptable, with the exception of Form I-129.  It appears USCIS is continuing to accept prior version of Form

On October 24, 2016, the United States Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) published a final rule confirming an increase to the processing fees for most of the applications and petitions it handles. This is a result of USCIS’ comprehensive review of the fee schedule for the fiscal year 2016/2017 the first USCIS fee increase since

In a continuation of its effort to encourage eligible immigrants to become U.S. citizens, the Obama administration is proposing adjustments to the immigration benefit fee schedule that would raise the cost of some benefits but reduce naturalization fees for certain low-income immigrants.

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) released its proposed changes to the U.S.

A number of employers have reported receiving suspicious letters being sent to L-1A executives.  The letters use incorrect grammar, and claim to be signed by Lori Scialabba, Deputy Director of USCIS.  Upon learning of these suspicious letters, The American Immigration Lawyer’s Association (AILA) reached out to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), which confirmed that

On December 18, 2015, President Obama signed The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2016 (Public Law 114-113) into law, which increased fees for certain H-1B and L-1 petitioners. This law effectively reinstates PL 111-230, which sunset on Sept. 30, 2014, but increases the applicable fees.  According to the new law, H-1B visa petitioners who employ 50 or

H-1B and L-1 employers who were subject to Public Law 111-230 and required to pay an additional filing fee of either $2,000 (H-1B) or $2,250 (L-1) do not need to pay these fees for petitions filed on or after Oct. 1, 2015. This additional fee only applied to certain companies with large numbers of H1B

If you’re waiting for your employment card or greencard to be issued, your wait may be slightly longer than usual by a few weeks. 

AILA (the American Immigration Lawyers Association) provided notice that there have been reports of delayed issuance of employment cards (EADs) and of US Permanent Residence cards.  The delay is not in