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Immigration View

Navigating Complex U.S. Immigration Laws

FY2017 H-1B Cap: USCIS Temporarily Suspends Use of Pre-Paid Mailers for Certain H-1B Cap Subject Petitions

Posted in General Immigration News and Updates, H-1B Temporary Workers

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) announced on April 20, 2016 that that for two weeks after premium processing resumes for H-1B cap-subject petitions (scheduled to start on May 12, 2016), USCIS will temporarily suspend use of Pre-Paid Mailers. This means that USCIS will not use any provided pre-paid mailers submitted with H-1B cap petitions to return the final notices for premium processing subject H-1B cap petitions.  USCIS will instead use regular postal mail.

USCIS has stated that they have instituted this procedure due to resource limitations as they work to process all premium processing petitions in a timely manner.  After the two week period, USCIS will resume sending out final notices in pre-paid mailers, if provided by petitioners.

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Alka Bahal is a Partner and the Co-Chair of the Corporate Immigration Practice of Fox Rothschild LLP. Alka is situated in Fox Rothschild’s Roseland, New Jersey office though she practices throughout the United States and at Consulates worldwide. You can reach Alka at (973) 994-7800, or abahal@foxrothschild.com.

FY2017 H-1B Cap: Premium Processing to Start on May 12, 2016

Posted in H-1B Temporary Workers

This just in…the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) issued a news release on Friday, April 22nd stating that the premium processing clock will start on Thursday, May 12, 2016. In other words, on May 12, 2016, USCIS will begin premium processing for cap-subject H-1B petitions.

Readers may recall that an H-1B petitioner may opt to pay an extra filing fee of $1,225.00 in exchange for premium or 15 calendar-day processing of an H-1B petition. Premium processing may be requested along with the filing of the initial petition or if the employer has a receipt notice, it may “upgrade” an already-pending H-1B petition to premium processing by filing a separate request.

Premium processing doesn’t guarantee a decision within 15 days. Rather, it means that action will be taken on a case within 15 days. That action may be a decision or it may be a request for evidence if the adjudicator finds something lacking in the petition. If a request for evidence (RFE) is issued, then from the date when USCIS receives the reply, another 15-day processing period will begin.

Normally, the 15 calendar-day processing period begins when a petition is received. Due to USCIS’s receipt of approximately 236,000 H-1B petitions during the first 5 or so days of H-1B cap season, USCIS delayed the start of the 15-day period.

As stated by USCIS in its release:

For H-1B petitions that are not subject to the cap and for any other visa classification, the 15-day processing period for premium processing service begins on the date that USCIS receives the request. However, for cap-subject H-1B petitions, including advanced degree exemption petitions, the 15-day processing period set by 8 CFR 103.7(e)(2) will begin on May 12, 2016, regardless of the date on the Form I-797 receipt notice, which indicates the date that the premium processing fee is received.

Those who requested premium processing will likely receive decisions by Friday, May 27th or so.

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Catherine Wadhwani is a Partner in Fox Rothschild LLP’s Immigration Practice Group.  She may be reached at (412) 394-5540 or cwadhwani@foxrothschild.com.

Robert S. Whitehill is a Partner and the Chair of Fox Rothschild LLP’s Immigration Practice Group.  He may be reached at (412) 394-5595 or rwhitehill@foxrothschild.com.

 

USCIS Workload Transfers

Posted in General Immigration News and Updates

Recently, USCIS has transferred certain types of cases from the Vermont Service Center (VSC) to the Nebraska Service Center (NSC) or the California Service Center (CSC) to balance workload and decrease processing times.

The NSC will now process some of the following types of cases:

  • Form I-129, Petition for a Nonimmigrant Worker, for petitioners requesting H-1B nonimmigrant classification;
  • Form I-539, Application to Extend/Change Nonimmigrant Status, for the H-4 nonimmigrant classification; and
  • Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization, for H-4 nonimmigrants applying for employment authorization.

The CSC will now process some of the following cases:

  • Form I-129, Petition for a Nonimmigrant Worker, for petitioners requesting L-1 Intracompany Transferee nonimmigrant classification;
  • Form I-539, Application to Extend/Change Nonimmigrant Status, for the L-2 nonimmigrant classification; and
  • Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization, for L-2 nonimmigrants applying for employment authorization.

USCIS issued transfer notices to the relevant parties on all affected cases. Per USCIS, receipt numbers will not change and the transfer will not delay the processing of any applications or petitions.

To facilitate this process, USCIS has also created a new Workload Transfer Updates page where customers can keep track of workload transfers between USCIS’ five service centers.  The new web page will list all of the transfers that USCIS makes as well as any additional information that customers should know about the transfer.

FY 2017 H-1B Cap: What are the Odds?

Posted in General Immigration News and Updates

For FY 2017, the US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) received approximately 236,000 cap-subject H-1B petitions—which is more than last year by about 3,000 petitions.  Because the number of available spots remained the same, the odds of “winning” the H-1B Cap Lottery are slightly worse than last year.

Using the limited information available and basic mathematical calculations, simple math shows that the overall odds of receiving a number in the FY 2017 H-1B cap are just over 33%.  If you deduct the 20,000 advanced degree “winners” from the total 236,000 petitions, and re-calculate, the odds decrease to just over 26% for the remaining petitions which include both the unselected advanced degree petitions and the regular cap petitions.

This compares to my FY 2016 calculations of about 34% for the Master’s cap and only approximately 27% for the regular cap.  For FY 2015 H-1B my calculations indicated that the odds were about 43% under the regular cap, with still better chances for those with a Master’s or higher degree at approximately 50%.

So each year, the odds of being selected in the lottery have decreased.  This year, however, the difference is much less dramatic than the change between FY 2015 and FY 2016.  Perhaps the economic improvement of recent years has stabilized and demand for highly specialized workers is leveling out.  Or, it could be that some pressure for H-1B numbers was alleviated due to the eligibility of certain H-4 spouses for work authorization.  (See my blog post H-4 EAD Applications Accepted Beginning May 26, 2015:  Are you that “certain spouse”? at http://immigrationview.foxrothschild.com/general-immigration-news-and-updates/h-4-ead-applications-accepted-beginning-may-26-2015-are-you-that-certain-spouse/.)  Nobody can say for sure.

What we do know is that USCIS completed its computer-generated random selection process (i.e., lottery selection) on April 9th.  Receipt notices (I-797 Notices of Action to acknowledge petition receipt) are still being sent.  Will you be one of the lucky winners?  Time will tell whether your petition is selected in the lottery or it will be one of the over approximately 150,000 petitions that will be rejected and returned to employers.

For more information regarding the “odds” during FY 2016 and FY 2015, please see my prior blog posts captioned, FY 2016 H-1B Cap:  What are the Odds? at http://immigrationview.foxrothschild.com/general-immigration-news-and-updates/fy-2016-h-1b-cap-what-are-the-odds/ and FY 2015 H-1B Cap:  What are the Odds? at http://immigrationview.foxrothschild.com/h-1b-temporary-workers/fy-2015-h-1b-cap-what-are-the-odds/.

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Catherine Wadhwani is a partner in Fox Rothschild LLP’s Immigration Practice Group.  You can reach Catherine at (412) 394-5540 or cwadhwani@foxrothschild.com.

 

Immigrant Visa Processing Changes – EB2/3 India moves forward; EB2/3 China retrogression expected – Visa Office on Priority Dates, Demand, and Predictions

Posted in EB-5 Immigrant Investor Program, General Immigration News and Updates, Immigrant Visas, PERM Labor Certification, Permanent Residence, Priority Dates

In our continuing series of reports, Charles (“Charlie”) Oppenheim, Chief of the Visa Control and Reporting Division, U.S. Department of State, shares his most recent analysis of current trends and future projections for the various immigrant preference categories with AILA (the American Immigration Lawyers’ Association).

Below are highlights from the most recent “check-in with Charlie” (April 13, 2016), reflecting his analysis of current trends and future projections for the various immigrant preference categories.

This month, Charlie examines the final action date movements in the May 2016 Visa Bulletin and his analysis of current trends and future projections for the various immigrant preference categories.

Family-Based Projections. Because most family-based demand is generated at overseas posts, Charlie has greater visibility into those categories and is able to move the final action dates more consistently than the employment-based categories, which has a high percentage of USCIS-based (adjustment of status) filings. As a result, dramatic fluctuations in the family-based categories tend to be rare and typically occur only when there is a surge in family-based applicants responding to the agent of choice letter and becoming documentarily qualified.

As noted in the May Visa Bulletin, the final action dates for FB-4 China and India will remain at July 22, 2003, consistent with the final action date for FB-4 Worldwide. However, we can expect to see changes soon due to an increase in demand in both of these categories in recent months. The FB-4 India final action date will likely retrogress, possibly as early as June. It may also be necessary to hold or retrogress the FB-4 China final action date in late summer.

New Final Action Date for EB-4 and Certain Religious Workers (SR) Preference Categories. In May, a final action date of January 1, 2010 will be imposed for EB-4 and certain religious workers from El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras. The imposition of a final action date for these countries in these categories is primarily attributable to a spike in demand for adjustment of status over the past two months for Special Immigrant Juvenile (SIJS) applicants. As noted in the Bulletin, any forward movement in these categories this fiscal year is unlikely.

Charlie advises that the per country limit for this category has already been reached for these countries for this fiscal year. Given EB-4 Worldwide demand, it is unlikely that there will be any additional “otherwise unused numbers” to allocate to these countries. Similarly, it is extremely likely that EB-4 India and Mexico will also become oversubscribed at some point during the summer months.

EB-5 China. Although demand in this category is increasing, I-526 petitions are being acted upon more quickly so the final action date may continue to advance slowly. Charlie has good visibility into demand in this category since most of these cases are at the NVC, although they are becoming documentarily qualified at their own pace.

EB-2 and EB-3 Philippines. EB-2 Philippines remains current and Charlie expects it to remain so for the foreseeable future. With regard to EB-3 Philippines, Charlie expects the final action date to continue to advance a few months at a time, consistent with movement over the past few months. He does not foresee it returning to the Worldwide final action date this fiscal year.

There is significant pent up demand in this category and given the greater level of visibility into it, Charlie is able to more the final action date consistently. Currently, the Texas Service Center has more than 1,600 EB-3 Philippines cases in the pending demand file and the Nebraska Service Center has more than 1,200. Demand at the U.S. Consulate in Manila is about half of that at USCIS. Charlie hopes that the EB-3 Philippines final action date will advance as far as mid-2010 by the end of this fiscal year.

EB-2 and EB-3 China. Recently, number usage for EB-3 China has exploded due to the EB-3 downgrade effect that Charlie has been expecting. Although anticipated, there was no advance warning as to when this demand would materialize, to what extent, or for how long. Demand for EB-3 China numbers exceeded 400 in March alone. EB-2 China spiked to 850 in March. April demand in both categories is expected to be at least on par with March demand, and may possibly exceed it. As a result, it would most likely be necessary to retrogress EB-2 and EB-3 China in June in an effort to hold number use within the annual limit.

EB-1 Demand and Impact to Other Categories. EB-1 demand from USCIS increased almost 100 percent from February (2,500+) to March (5,000+) which reflects more than 95 percent of the EB-1 Worldwide demand. This spike leaves fewer numbers to potentially spill down to other categories, which will impact EB-2 final action dates. Members should expect that the EB categories that typically rely on unused EB-1 numbers, such as EB-2 India, will be impacted. It remains to be seen whether a cut-off date will need to be established for any EB-1 countries this fiscal year.

India Employment-Based Final Action Dates. The final action date for EB-2 India will advance modestly, from November 8, 2008 in April to November 22, 2008 in May. Similarly, EB-3 India will creep forward from August 8, 2004 in April to September 1, 2004 in May. EB-3 demand, after the initial allocation of numbers, has been increasing by 100 month over month from January to February and February to March.

A number of factors make it difficult for Charlie to accurately predict movement in these categories. Increased EB-1 usage negatively impacts the supply of available visas for EB-2 India, and upgrades are currently driving EB-2 India demand. As a result of these two factors, there may be fewer numbers available to EB-2 India than previously expected.

When USCIS requests an EB-2 number in an upgrade case, it also asks that the previously requested EB-3 number be cancelled. Charlie has no visibility into EB-2 upgrade demand until USCIS completes adjudication of the I-485, requests an EB-2 number, and cancels the EB-3 number. This lack of visibility can potentially result in unexpected and dramatic changes in the EB-2 India final action date, as well as other employment-based preference categories.

You may access the May 2016 Visa Bulletin here and the April 2016 Visa Bulletin here.

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Alka Bahal is a Partner and the Co-Chair of the Corporate Immigration Practice of Fox Rothschild LLP. Alka is situated in Fox Rothschild’s Roseland, New Jersey office though she practices throughout the United States and at Consulates worldwide. You can reach Alka at (973) 994-7800, or abahal@foxrothschild.com.

EB-5 Immigration Reform Landscape in 2016

Posted in Consular Issues, EB-5 Immigrant Investor Program, Employment Verification Compliance (including I-9s, E-Verify, and Enforcement), Immigrant Visas, PERM Labor Certification, Permanent Residence

Congress in 2015 tried to tackle new EB-5 reform legislation, but instead chose to extend the program without any changes until September 30, 2016. This was a result of an impasse on issues relating to increase in the capital threshold amount and the change in the metrics used to determine what is a (“TEA”) targeted employment area. The contentious debate on these issues provided both developers and regional centers one more year of status quo in the program.

What will happen this year is anyone’s guess. What we do know is that Congress is holding hearings on EB-5 reform. These hearings provide the opportunity for individuals in the EB-5 industry to voice their opinion as to the future of the program.

On Wednesday April 13th 2016, the Senate Judiciary Committee held its second hearing of 2016 on the EB-5 Program titled, The Distortion of EB-5 Targeted Employment Areas: Time to End the Abuse.  The Senate Judiciary Committee heard from several witnesses including the Executive Director of IIUSA, Peter Joseph.  IIUSA is the national non-profit trade association representing EB-5 developers, regional centers and other professionals that are in the EB-5 space. Peter Joseph in his testimony pointed to several critical issues that the Committee should consider in the long term reauthorization of the EB-5 legislation. Those issues include:

  • Increase visa capacity to enhance economic impact of EB-5 and address the backlog of

investors currently waiting for visas to be available.

  • Staff commercially viable processing system at USCIS that addresses existing backlogs

and prioritizes predictability and length of processing times for EB-5 related petitions and

applications.

  • Avoid retroactive application of new law and reform to protect the existing EB-5

investors and their families and the billions of dollars in financial commitments and

contractual obligations.

  • Ensure all EB-5 investors with petitions currently filed, or at a later stage in the EB-5

process, are guaranteed adjudication (not approval) and eligibility for immigration

benefits throughout the entire EB-5 process (I-526 petition, EB-5 visa issuance, and I-829 petition)

regardless of future reforms, lapses, or expiration of the program.

  • Continue to allow economic impact models including indirect/induced job creation to

count for EB-5 purposes (using the same econometric models that are generally accepted

as economic policymaking tools by government, academia, and business).

  • Improve program integrity, including through enhanced oversight and reporting

requirements of Regional Centers that are not unduly burdensome, such as site visits

funded by user fees.

  • Clarify geographic (including targeted employment areas (TEAs)), structural, and

industry project characteristics that enable consistent adjudication of EB-5 petitions and

applications.

The issues that Peter Joseph mentioned in his testimony on Capitol Hill clearly mirror the position that most in the EB-5 industry have taken on EB-5 reform. The program has been largely a success with a substantial amount of foreign capital being invested in job creating projects in the United States. Everyone in the EB-5 space would like to see an extension of the EB-5 legislation for at least a five (5) year period.

Since 2008, the Program’s annual contribution to foreign direct investment inbound into the U.S. grew over 1,200% to total almost $5 billion in fiscal year 2015 alone. This investment capital is creating tens of thousands of jobs for U.S. workers in diverse communities by funding projects in a wide variety of industry sectors across the country.

Will Congress take any action this year to reform the current EB-5 legislation? I believe not.

This is a Presidential election year. It is very likely that Congress will defer on making any substantive changes to the EB-5 program until 2017. Immigration reform legislation has never passed both houses of Congress in an election year.

The economic benefits of the EB-5 program are not in dispute. The major issue that Congress needs to address is improving the compliance portion of the legislation. This will provide transparency to the program. Something that is much needed.

 

USCIS Completes the H-1B Cap Random Selection Process for FY 2017

Posted in General Immigration News and Updates, H-1B Temporary Workers

On April 7, 2016, USCIS announced that it has received enough H-1B petitions to reach the statutory cap of 65,000 visas for fiscal year (FY) 2017. USCIS has also received more than the limit of 20,000 H-1B petitions filed under the advanced degree exemption, also known as the master’s cap.

Yesterday USCIS announced that, on April 9, it used a computer-generated random selection process to select enough petitions to meet the 65,000 general-category cap and the 20,000 cap under the advanced degree exemption. USCIS also confirmed its receipt of more than 236,000 H-1B petitions during the filing period, which began April 1 and ended April 7.  This is slightly higher than the number of filings received last year (233,000).

USCIS conducted the selection process for the advanced degree exemption first. All unselected advanced degree petitions then became part of the random selection process for the 65,000 limit.

USCIS will issue Receipt Notices (Form I-797C) for those petitions that were selected for adjudication in the random lottery process and reject and return all unselected petitions with their filing fees, unless the petition is found to be a duplicate filing.

USCIS will begin premium processing for H-1B cap cases no later than May 16, 2016, per its previous announcement.

USCIS will continue to accept and process petitions that are otherwise exempt from the cap. Petitions filed on behalf of current H-1B workers who have been counted previously against the cap will also not be counted towards the congressionally mandated FY 2017 H-1B cap. USCIS will continue to accept and process petitions filed to:

  • Extend the amount of time a current H-1B worker may remain in the United States;
  • Change the terms of employment for current H-1B workers;
  • Allow current H-1B workers to change employers; and
  • Allow current H-1B workers to work concurrently in a second H-1B position. U.S. businesses use the H-1B program to employ foreign workers in occupations that require highly specialized knowledge in fields such as science, engineering, and computer programming.

If Fox Rothschild has prepared and file an H-1B petition on your company’s behalf, we will automatically notify you upon our receipt of a Receipt Notice confirming selection in the random lottery process or a returned petition, confirming rejection/not selected.

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Alka Bahal is a Partner and the Co-Chair of the Corporate Immigration Practice of Fox Rothschild LLP. Alka is situated in Fox Rothschild’s Roseland, New Jersey office though she practices throughout the United States and at Consulates worldwide. You can reach Alka at (973) 994-7800, or abahal@foxrothschild.com.

FY 2017 H-1B Cap Reached on April 7, 2016

Posted in H-1B Temporary Workers, Startup Companies

As anticipated, the number of cap-subject H-1B petitions filed by U.S. employers exceeded the 65,000 general cap and the 20,000 master’s degree exemption for fiscal year 2017 (FY2017).

Yesterday, April 7, 2016, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS or the Immigration Service) announced that the FY 2017 H-1B cap had been reached and that it had also received more than 20,000 petitions under the master’s or higher degree exemption.

At this point the Immigration Service will turn its attention to initial intake on the H-1B petitions that it received before the cap was reached.  Due to the high volume of petitions received, USCIS stated that it cannot yet say when it will implement use of its computer-generated H-1B Lottery process to determine which petitions will be processed.

As in prior years, petitions filed under the advanced degree exemption will be selected first.  Thereafter, presuming that there are in excess of 20,000 advanced degree petitions, the remaining advanced degree petitions will be added into the 65,000 general cap for consideration.

Petitions that are not selected and are not duplicate filings will be rejected and returned (with unused filing fees) to the petitioner.

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Catherine Wadhwani is a partner in Fox Rothschild LLP’s Immigration Practice Group.  You can reach Catherine at (412) 394-5540 or cwadhwani@foxrothschild.com.

 

FY 2017 H-1B Cap Petitions: What to Expect

Posted in H-1B Temporary Workers, Startup Companies

As you likely know, April 1st was the first day when cap-subject H-1B petitions could be accepted for Fiscal Year 2017.  Now that the filings have started, here is a quick summary of some key information provided by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS or Immigration Services) in a March 16, 2016 release captioned, “USCIS Will Accept H-1B Petitions for Fiscal Year 2017 Beginning April 1, 2016”:

  • The congressionally mandated H-1B cap remains at 65,000 for FY 2017 along with the cap exemption for the first 20,000 petitions received for those with a U.S. master’s degree or higher (the latter being commonly referred to as the “Master’s Cap”).
  • It is again expected that USCIS will receive more than 65,000 petitions during the first 5 business days of April 2016.
  • USCIS will monitor the number of petitions received and let public know when the H-1B cap has been reached.
  • The H-1B Lottery system (computer-generated lottery system to randomly select the number of petitions required to meet the cap) will again be used if as expected, during the first 5 business days of April, USCIS receives more cap-subject H-1B petitions than there are numbers available.
  • If your petition isn’t selected in the Lottery or is received after the cap is closed, USCIS will reject it.
  • An H-1B petition is “accepted” only on the date when USCIS receives a properly filed petition with the appropriate fees.
  • Premium (15-day) Processing of cap-subject H-1B petitions is expected to be delayed, but begin no later than May 16, 2016.  This is to allow personnel time to enter data on the massive number of petitions that are expected during the first 5 business days of April.
  • USCIS provided special instruction for employers whose H-1B workers will work in different locations as follows:  “H-1B petitioners are reminded that when the temporary employment or training will be in different locations, the state where your company or organization’s primary office is located will determine where you should send your Form I-129 package, regardless of where in the United States the various worksites are located. Please ensure that when temporary employment or training will be in different locations, the address on page 1, part 1 of Form I-129 is for your organization’s primary office. Please note that when listing a “home office” as a work site location on Part 5, question 3, USCIS will consider this a separate and distinct work site location.”

Let the data entry begin…

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Catherine Wadhwani is a Partner in Fox Rothschild LLP’s Immigration Practice Group.  Catherine is situated in Fox Rothschild’s Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania office though she practices throughout the United States and at Consulates worldwide.  You can reach Catherine at (412) 394-5540 or cwadhwani@foxrothschild.com.

 

Current edition of Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification, Remains Effective After March 31, 2016

Posted in Employment Verification Compliance (including I-9s, E-Verify, and Enforcement), General Immigration News and Updates

Today the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) confirmed that employers should continue using the current edition of the Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification until further notice, despite the date of expiration noted on the form of March 31, 2016.  Per USCIS, this current version of the form continues to be effective even after the Office of Management and Budget control number expiration date of March 31, 2016, has passed. USCIS will provide updated information about the new version of Form I-9 as it becomes available.

This announcement follows USCIS’s March 28, 2016, Federal Register notice announcing a 30-day period for the public to comment on its proposed changes to the I-9 Form.  Comments will be accepted until April 27, 2016.

You may recall that last fall (on November 24, 2015), USCIS published a notice of its proposed changes to the I-9 form in the Federal Register, with a 60-day public comment period.  The recently announced 30-day comment period enables further input from the public after USCIS incorporated proposed changes to the form based on remarks received from the public during the 60-day comment period.

USCIS has stated that a goal is to improve the I-9 form in an effort to reduce the number of technical errors, and listed the following as key proposed changes:

  • Validations on certain fields to ensure information is entered correctly;
  • Additional spaces to enter multiple preparers and translators;
  • Drop-down lists and calendars;
  • Embedded instructions for completing each field;
  • Buttons that will allow users to access the instructions electronically, print the form and clear the form to start over;
  • A dedicated area to enter additional information that employers are currently required to notate in the margins of the form;
  • A quick-response matrix barcode, or QR code, that generates once the form is printed that can be used to streamline audit processes;
  • Requiring employees to provide only other last names used in Section 1, rather than all other names used;
  • Removing the requirement that aliens authorized to work provide both their Form I-94 number and foreign passport information in Section 1;
  • Separating instructions from the form, in keeping with USCIS practice;
  • Adding a Supplement in cases where more than one preparer or translator is used to complete Section 1.After the comment period ends, USCIS has indicated that additional changes may be made before the new Form I-9 ultimately is made available for use by the public.

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Alka Bahal is a Partner and the Co-Chair of the Corporate Immigration Practice of Fox Rothschild LLP. Alka is situated in Fox Rothschild’s Roseland, New Jersey office though she practices throughout the United States and at Consulates worldwide. You can reach Alka at (973) 994-7800 or abahal@foxrothschild.com.

Catherine Wadhwani is a Partner in Fox Rothschild LLP’s Immigration Practice Group. Catherine is situated in Fox Rothschild’s Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania office though she practices throughout the United States and at Consulates worldwide.  You can reach Catherine at (412) 394-5540 or cwadhwani@foxrothschild.com.